Priority Populations, Children 0 -12, Youth 13-19, Adults 20-55, Senior / Elders 55+, Women, Men, Aboriginal People, People with HIV/AIDS, Visible Minority Groups, Multi-Cultural Communities, Francophone, People in Remote, Rural Northern Communities, Disabled, Homeless

The kids are not alright

-- Submitted by Heart & Stroke

Following is an abbreviated version of the Heart & Stroke 2017 Report on the Health of Canadians: The kids are not alright – How the food and beverage industry is marketing our children and youth to death.

To read the full report visit http://heartandstroke.ca/heartreport.

Call to action – everyone has a role to play

Participatory Evaluation: The case for setting a place for ‘young people’ at the ‘adult’ table

Contents

I Introduction
II Principles of Youth Engagement
III Participatory Evaluation Benefits Youth
IV Participatory Data Collection and Analysis
V Facilitators for Participatory Data Collection and Analysis
VI Conclusion

--Submitted by Allison Meserve, Health Promotion Consultant, Health Promotion Capacity Building, Public Health Ontario and Kristy Ste Marie, Acting Manager, YATI & Youth Engagement, Youth Advocacy Training Institute, Ontario Lung Association

I Introduction

Mind the connection: Preventing stroke and dementia

-- Submitted by Dr. Patrice Lindsay and Stephanie Lawrence, Heart and Stroke Foundation

Stroke and dementia — it’s all in our heads

Stroke and dementia have much in common. Both are diseases of the brain. Stroke happens when the blood flow to the brain is interrupted and cells die as a result. Vascular dementia is often a further result of stroke damage, from either larger strokes or smaller ones accumulating over time.

Determinants of Indigenous peoples’ health and well-being: Featured publications from the National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health

Contents

I Introduction
II An Indigenous framework for understanding the determinants of health
III The impacts of trauma for Indigenous peoples’ mental health and well-being
IV Aboriginal peoples and historic trauma
V The need for Aboriginal core competencies for public health  
VI Conclusion
VII References

-- Submitted by Regine Halseth, Research Associate

I Introduction

Keeping kids safe at home, at play, and on the road

Contents

I Overview of Child Injuries in Ontario
II Safe Kids Week: At Home, at Play, and on the Road
III Child Injury Prevention Training and Resources
IV Data Sources

--Submitted by Stephanie Cowle, Ontario Injury Prevention Resource Centre (OIPRC) and Julie Taylor, Parachute

I Overview of Child Injuries in Ontario

Risk factors for varicella susceptibility among refugees to Toronto, Canada

Contents

I Background
II Methods
III Results
IV Discussion
V Conclusions

Submitted by

Falls from Ladders: A Seasonal Hazard

Contents

I Introduction
II Not Our Typical Fallers
III A Campaign for Change
IV Key Prevention Messages and Resources
V Conclusion
VI References

--Submitted by Stephanie Cowle, Ontario Injury Prevention Resource Centre (OIPRC)

I Introduction

Children See. Children Learn.

Contents

I Introduction
II Background
III Campaign Strategies
IV Events
V Key Organizations
VI Positive Discipline Parenting Programs
VII References

--Submitted by Louise Choquette, Bilingual Health Promotion Consultant, Best Start Resource Centre, Health Nexus

I Introduction

Refugee Health Cuts: The Context, The Current Coverage, and The Call to Action

Contents

I Introduction
II The context
III The current coverage
IV The call to action
V Resources

--Submitted by Ritika Goel

I Introduction

What happens when a government decides that instead of protecting and providing for the most marginalized people in the society, it will instead attack and deny services to them? The 2012 cuts to the refugee health program in Canada have been an exercise in determining exactly that.

Parenting, Child Development, and Substance Abuse

Contents

I Introduction
II Parenting style
III Love hormone
IV Being interested in your teenager’s life; Child Welfare system
V Parents’ substance use impacts teens
VI Conclusion and key learnings
VII Resources
VIII References

--Submitted by Seher Shafiq, Parent Action on Drugs

I Introduction

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