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New Reports from CIHI

Disparities in Primary Health Care Experiences Among Canadians with Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions

Despite a tendency to report overall satisfaction with their primary health care, Canadians living with ambulatory care sensitive conditions may not be receiving all the care they need, according to a new release titled Disparities in Primary Health Care Experiences Among Canadians With Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions. Barriers and challenges exist for two groups in particular—lower-income individuals and women. Lower-income individuals are less likely to report that their primary health care physician involves them in clinical decisions, and women are less likely than men to report receiving all four recommended tests for chronic disease monitoring or to have medication side effects explained.  This new report by the Canadian Population Health Initiative (CPHI) of the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) looks at differences by socio-economic and geographic conditions, health conditions and sex in the access to, use of and appropriateness of primary health care experiences for people diagnosed with ambulatory care sensitive conditions.  To download this report, visit https://secure.cihi.ca/estore/productFamily.htm?locale=en&pf=PFC1712. For more information about this product, please contact Sushma Mathur at [email protected].

The Role of Social Support in Reducing Psychological Distress

A new Analysis in Brief titled The Role of Social Support in Reducing Psychological Distress has been released by the Canadian Population Health Initiative (CPHI) of the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI). This study demonstrates that social support is an important factor in promoting the transition from high levels to lower levels of distress two years later; it also shows that the significant supports are different for men and women. For women, regular opportunities to interact and talk with people showed a reduction in distress, whereas for men, being married was connected to improvements in levels of distress.  To download this Analysis in Brief, visit https://secure.cihi.ca/estore/productFamily.htm?locale=en&pf=PFC1714.  For more information about this product, please contact Lisa Corscadden at [email protected].